Feb 282021
 

Today is the second Sunday of Lent, known as Reminiscere Sunday from the introit, Reminiscere miserationum tuarum Domine, which in English can be rendered:

Remember, O Lord, Thy compassions and Thy mercies, which are from the beginning, lest at any time our enemies rule over us: deliver us O God of Israel, from all our tribulations.

I did actually pay lip service to the second Sunday in Lent some years ago, but it happened to coincide with Purim in the Jewish tradition, so it was second fiddle back then – https://www.bookofdaystales.com/purim/   This year I will pay more attention to Lent (Purim was February 25/26 this year).

The readings for Reminiscere Sunday are the promises to Abraham in Genesis 17, and a restatement of them in Romans 4. The bottom line is that success comes from having faith, trusting God, and being patient.  The curious part of the Genesis narrative is that Abram is promised a son, when he was 99 and his wife Sarai was 90.  Supposedly she laughed at the idea and, in consequence, her son was called Isaac, which can be read as “laughs” in Hebrew” (יִצְחָק). The point is that you will get what you have been promised if you just wait patiently.  God changes Abram’s name to Abraham and Sarai’s to Sarah after giving them the good news that their offspring will be more numerous than the stars in the sky, and a name change is always important in the Hebrew text.  In this case, the name changes have baffled scholars for centuries.  Sarai and Sarah are just dialectal variants of the same name, and Abram and Abraham are obscure etymologically, except they contain the roots “av” (אב) “father” and “ram” (רם) “high” – with the “ha” (ה) supposedly added in mark of the new covenant with God. That last bit has no justification in linguistics.

For a day that is all about remembering, you can think of recipes in two ways.  First, you can remember your favorite dish – perhaps from childhood.  Second, you can cook a favorite dish – from memory.  The latter is not too demanding.  Most of us cook from memory most of the time. For some mysterious reason, all my favorite dishes from childhood are from Argentina – milanesa, tuco, ravioli with brains, egg tortilla, dulce de leche, etc.  I have given recipes for all of them already. Instead here is a wonderful memory of my home – Doña Petrona’s cooking show. Doña Petrona was the chief celebrity cook in Argentina in the 1950s and ’60s, and her cookbook was beside the copy of Mrs Beeton in my house growing up.

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