Jan 142018
 

Today is the birthday (1741), according to the Gregorian calendar [O.S. January 3, 1740], of Benedict Arnold, a general during the American Revolutionary War, who fought for the American Continental Army, and later defected to the British Army, making his name in the US a byword for “turncoat” or “traitor.” I will give you the short version here. You can read about the complexities on your own. Rather uncharacteristically these days, I want to focus more on my recipe than on the anniversary it celebrates.

Arnold was born in Connecticut and was a merchant operating ships on the Atlantic Ocean when the war broke out in 1775. He joined the growing army outside Boston and distinguished himself through acts of intelligence and bravery. His actions included the Capture of Fort Ticonderoga in 1775, defensive and delaying tactics at the Battle of Valcour Island on Lake Champlain in 1776 (allowing American forces time to prepare New York’s defenses), the Battle of Ridgefield, Connecticut (after which he was promoted to major general), operations in relief of the Siege of Fort Stanwix, and key actions during the pivotal Battles of Saratoga in 1777, in which he suffered leg injuries that halted his combat career for several years.

Despite Arnold’s successes, he was passed over for promotion by the Continental Congress, while other officers claimed credit for some of his accomplishments. Adversaries in military and political circles brought charges of corruption or other malfeasance, but most often he was acquitted in formal inquiries. Congress investigated his accounts and concluded that he was indebted to Congress, even though he had also spent much of his own money on the war effort. Arnold was frustrated and bitter at this state of affairs.

Arnold was also not happy with the American colonies’ alliance with France and the failure of Congress to accept Britain’s 1778 proposal to grant full self-governance in the colonies. He decided to change sides, and opened secret negotiations with the British. In July 1780, he was awarded command of West Point, New York (at the time a fort which would become the site of the U.S. Military Academy in 1802), overlooking the cliffs at the Hudson River (upriver from British-occupied New York City), and planned to surrender them to British forces. His scheme was to surrender the fort to the British, but it was exposed when American forces captured British Major John André carrying papers which revealed the plot. Upon learning of André’s capture, Arnold fled down the Hudson River to the British sloop-of-war Vulture, narrowly avoiding capture by the forces of George Washington, who had been alerted to the plot.

Arnold received a commission as a brigadier general in the British Army, an annual pension of £360, and a lump sum of over £6,000. He led British forces on raids in Virginia and against New London and Groton, Connecticut before the war effectively ended with the American victory at Yorktown. In the winter of 1782, he moved to London with his second wife Margaret “Peggy” Shippen Arnold. He was well received by King George III and the Tories, but rather coolly by the Whigs. In 1787, he returned to the merchant business with his sons Richard and Henry in Saint John, New Brunswick. He returned to London to settle permanently in 1791, where he died ten years later.

The name “Benedict Arnold” quickly became a byword in the United States for a person who commits some sort of betrayal.  At one time the fact that Arnold betrayed his country by leading the British army in battle against the men he once commanded, was common knowledge. Benjamin Franklin wrote that Arnold was worse than Judas because “Judas sold only one man, Arnold three millions.” Nowadays, what Arnold actually did is less well known, but his name is still invoked for someone accused of being a turncoat. Why he did what he did is really hard to fathom.  Being unfairly overlooked for promotion can make you bitter, and wanting a long, drawn-out war to end when there is a chance for peace that is rejected by your seniors, can make you frustrated. Those things might make you disaffected enough to want to quit, even to leave the country, maybe migrate to England. But why would you become a commanding officer for the country you had been fighting against? There are answers to these questions, but I will leave you to find out more about Arnold and decide for yourself. Meanwhile I want to talk about foods that are turncoats.

When I get round to it – if I get round to it – I am going to write a cookbook on some basic dishes that we can make in the classic way, or we can change in some fashion or another so that they become “turncoats” of a sort. One will be eggs Benedict. If you check around you will find that eggs Benedict have absolutely nothing to do with Benedict Arnold, even though you can find recipes called “eggs Benedict Arnold.” The recipes are usually standard eggs Benedict with a change of name. But what if we change the ingredients? Then we would have true eggs Benedict Arnold. As it happens, this is by no means a new thought. In fact, I have already given a recipe for eggs Florentine which uses spinach in place of Canadian ham: http://www.bookofdaystales.com/machiavelli/ 

Standard eggs Benedict are a toasted English muffin, Canadian bacon, and a poached egg smothered in Hollandaise sauce. You can switch out any one of these four ingredients for another and you have your turncoat dish.  Here’s a list (and partial gallery) of these Benedict Arnold egg dishes (with the names they sometimes are called by):

Eggs Blackstone: streaky bacon instead of ham (sometimes with a tomato slice).

Eggs Blanchard: béchamel sauce instead of Hollandaise.

Eggs Chesapeake: Maryland blue crab cake instead of ham.

Eggs Mornay: Mornay sauce instead of Hollandaise.

Eggs Omar: a small steak instead of ham, (sometimes replaces the hollandaise with béarnaise).

Eggs Atlantic (also Eggs Hemingway, Eggs Copenhagen, Eggs Royale, Eggs Montreal, or Eggs Benjamin): smoked salmon instead of ham.

Huevos Benedictinos: sliced avocado and/or Mexican chorizo instead of ham, and salsa with the Hollandaise.

Irish Eggs Benedict: corned beef or Irish bacon instead of ham.

This is just a start for you. Take any of the ingredients and substitute something else. Eggs need to be poached, I think, but what about using a duck egg? What could you substitute for ham, or for the English muffin?

Dec 242015
 

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The Eggnog Riot, sometimes known as the Grog Mutiny, was a riot that took place at the United States Military Academy in West Point, New York, on 24–25 December 1826. It was caused by a drunken Christmas Day party in the North Barracks of the academy. The riot eventually involved more than one-third of the cadets by the time it ceased on Christmas morning. A subsequent investigation by academy officials resulted in the implication of seventy cadets, and the court-martialing of twenty of them and one enlisted soldier. Among the participants in the riot—though he was not court-martialed—was future Confederate States President, Jefferson Davis. The following account is lifted (edited) from:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eggnog_Riot

Sorry! It’s a busy time for me.

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In 1817, Sylvanus Thayer took command at the United States Military Academy. By 1826, the academy had 36 men serving as faculty and staff with four recognized departments – mathematics, engineering, natural philosophy (now physics, chemistry and life sciences), and military tactics. Alcohol possession at the academy was prohibited along with drunkenness, both of which could lead to expulsion. Tobacco use and gambling could lead to demerits, minor incarceration, or a loss of privileges. By 1826, concern had been raised that drinking was starting to get out of hand among the 260 cadets at the academy. The cadets were informed that, due to the alcohol prohibition on the site, their Christmas eggnog would be alcohol-free, prompting the cadets’ decision to smuggle liquor into the academy.

Timeline of events

22 December 1826

20:50 – 22:15

At Martin’s Tavern, cadets William R. Burnley (Alabama), Alexander J. Center (New York), and Samuel Alexander Roberts (Alabama) almost got into a fight with the proprietors of another tavern concerning getting whiskey back to West Point. Private James Dougan, the duty security guard, agreed to let the three cadets take a boat across the Hudson to smuggle the whiskey. The cadets planned to purchase a half-gallon of whiskey as an alcohol base for the eggnog party that would take place in the North Barracks two nights later. Phillip St. George (Virginia) was the 24-hour duty cadet guard of the day. Burnley, Center, and Roberts successfully obtained two gallons of whiskey, smuggling them into North Barracks room No.33. Cadet T. M. Lewis (Kentucky) also returned with a gallon of rum from Benny’s Tavern to North Barracks room No. 5.

Thayer

Thayer

23 December 1826

07:00

Thayer met with George Bomford (New York) and Robert E. Lee (Virginia). Bomford was questioned about his parental correspondence by Thayer, while Lee questioned Thayer about trigonometry problems for artillery gunnery. Classes and barracks inspections continued as usual that day.

17:45

A Christmas party took place at Thayer’s residence at which wine was served. Reverend Charles McIlvane, the academy chaplain, was among the attendees. During the party, a conversation ensued between Thayer and Major William J. Worth, the commandant of cadets, about Jefferson Davis’ (Mississippi) disciplinary problems. Entertainment was provided by the West Point band. The party ended at 21:30.

18:00

Four cadets, Walter B. Guion (Mississippi), Davis, John Stocker (Pennsylvania), and David Farrelly (Pennsylvania), met at Benny Haven’s tavern. They left before academy quartermaster Aeneas Mackay arrived.

Meanwhile at the North Barracks, cadets were planning the party. Preparations included stealing bits and pieces of food during their visits to the mess hall. During this time, cadets residing in the South Barracks found out about the North Barracks’ planned Christmas party.

Hitchcock

Hitchcock

24–25 December 1826

22:00 to 04:15

Nathaniel Eaton (Massachusetts) was the cadet in charge of the external post of the North Barracks. Captain Ethan Allen Hitchcock, a faculty member in military tactics, was also stationed in the North Barracks. Eaton and Hitchcock met and discussed the smuggled liquor in the North Barracks.

The eggnog party started among nine cadets in North Barracks room No. 28. Numerous cadets appeared as the party progressed, while another party began in room No. 5, mentioned by seven cadets including Davis. Farrelly went again to North’s or Havens and returned with another gallon of whiskey early on Christmas morning.

Cadet Charles Whipple (Michigan Territory), the division superintendent during the first part of the incident, went to North Barracks room No. 5 at 02:00 after hearing a commotion, interrupting a round of singing among eight cadets, including Davis. Whipple returned to his room after a verbal exchange with Davis and the other cadets. Hitchcock made another patrol around the barracks at 03:00. Lieutenant William A. Thornton was asleep while the events unfolded.

By 04:00, voices from the floor above Hitchcock were loud enough to cause the faculty member to investigate room No. 28, where Hitchcock knocked on the door and found six cadets drunk from the eggnog, as well as two others sleeping on a bed. Hitchcock ordered two of the cadets back to their rooms. After they left, Hitchcock woke the two sleeping cadets and ordered them to leave as well. Then he confronted cadet James W.M. “Weems” Berrien (Georgia), who responded with equal force. Hitchcock read the Riot Act to the residents of the room for possessing alcohol on the premises. The captain left the room at 04:15. Berrien began verbalizing his rage toward Hitchcock, which led William D.C. “Billy” Murdock (District of Columbia) to lead an effort to organize a riot against Hitchcock.

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25 December 1826

04:30 to 06:05

Hitchcock went down to his room to sleep. Three times he heard knocks on the door only to find no one there. After finding another cadet drunk, Hitchcock saw Davis head over to room No. 5 where thirteen cadets were partying. Davis, seeing Hitchcock’s arrival, warned the other cadets. The captain entered the room, ordering one of the cadets to open up another cadet’s footlocker, but the cadet refused. Hitchcock ordered no more disorder, left the room, and started looking for Thornton around 04:50.

Meanwhile Thornton had strolled the North Barracks between 21:00 on the 24th and 02:00 on Christmas Day observing the ongoing partying, before going to sleep at 02:00. He was awoken by loud yells and, once out of his room, was attacked by two cadets. Thornton then put cadet William P.N. Fitzgerald (New York) under arrest for brandishing a weapon. Fitzgerald retreated from Thornton, then told two cadets in room No. 29 about the arrest.

At this point, noises erupted from the South Barracks which distracted Thornton. While going to investigate that commotion, Thornton was knocked out by Roberts, who had been ejected from room No. 28 by Hitchcock earlier that evening.

Davis was asleep, but other cadets went looking for Hitchcock. Three other cadets were discovered by cadet James G. Overton (Tennessee), a relief sentinel and not involved in the parties, and questioned about their actions. They gave a drunken explanation about needing drums and a fife.

At around 05:00, Hitchcock found another inebriated cadet wandering the academy.

By this point, several window panes had been broken. Hitchcock returned to the room where he was staying, No. 8. Several cadets then attacked his door, Guion drawing his pistol and firing a shot into the room. Hitchcock opened the door and yelled at the cadets to stop. The captain then began arresting cadets.

Worth

Worth

Hitchcock ordered Eaton to find Worth’s headquarters. Overton asked Hitchcock to find Thayer and Hitchcock replied “No, Mr. Overton. Fetch the com(Commandant Worth) here.” Several of the drunken cadets thought Hitchcock had said that the bombardiers would be the ones to quell the riot, using heavy weapons, causing several cadets who were not drunk to take up arms in defense of the North Barracks. Thayer had been awoken at 05:00 by the sound of drums. He ordered his aide, Patrick Murphy, to get Major Worth because of what he could hear going on in the North Barracks.

Hitchcock continued restoring order in the North Barracks, getting into a fight with cadet Walter Otey (Virginia). Thornton awoke from the stairway where he had been knocked out and returned to his room. Hitchcock greeted him in his room at 05:45. By 06:00, other cadets who were not drinking were also involved in restoring order. The main rioters were attempting to recruit other cadets, but with no success.

Overton could not find Cadet Eaton, who was checking the South Barracks, but did find Major Worth. Hitchcock met Worth and told him what had transpired. By this time, Thayer’s aide had arrived in the North Barracks’ guardroom. The Second Artillery had arrived at the North Barracks by the time of reveille at 06:05.

06:05–18:30

Reveille sounded at 06:05, along with gunfire, the sound of glass breaking, profanity by cadets, cries of pain, and threats to academy officials. North Barracks residents who were not drunk from the eggnog were appalled by the damaged property. Cadets in the South Barracks were well rested, while other cadets in the North Barracks were disheveled. Some of the cadets remained in their rooms drinking, although some appeared in parade formation despite being drunk. Worth met with superintendent Thayer after the first formation to discuss what had happened in the North Barracks the previous evening. Thayer instructed Worth to get the officers into the North Barracks and restore order.

Captain Mackay, academy quartermaster, took down details of the damages to the property at North Barracks so repairs could take place in the following days. Many cadets who were drunk made it to company roll call at 06:20, though they were subdued. The mutiny officially ended when Cadet Captain James A.J. Bradford (Kentucky) called the corps to attention and dismissed them from the mess hall after breakfast. Chapel formation took place after breakfast, followed by two hours of service, with most of the drunk cadets still recovering.

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Thayer was advised by Worth regarding the events at North Barracks. Captain Hitchcock and Lieutenant Thornton were bruised, while several cadets suffered minor injuries, and Fitzgerald suffered a hand injury. Worth told Thayer that between fifty and ninety cadets had been involved in the mutiny. Later that day, Thayer met with Gouverneur Kemble, an ordnance manufacturer in Cold Spring, New York, to discuss different items, including the events at West Point. Kemble asked Thayer what he would do about the misconduct, to which Thayer replied he did not know.

26 December 1826

07:00–08:00

A faculty and staff meeting took place, with all but Captain Thomas C. Legate of the 2nd Artillery A Battery and a few assistant professors in attendance. Thayer informed them that Major General Alexander Macomb, Chief of Engineers and Inspector General of the Academy, had been told of the riot, and that he was awaiting orders from Macomb. The superintendent also informed the attendees that an inquiry would take place during semester finals in January 1827, so some of the cadets would face simultaneous examinations and inquiry.

Macomb

Macomb

Cadet Battalion Order 98 was read at formation and posted at several prominent locations at the academy. Twenty-two cadets were placed under house arrest until further notice; among them was Davis, who had been reported as a malefactor by Hitchcock and Thornton.

Davis was never charged, but 19 other cadets were. All but one (John Archibald Campbell – later Justice of the Supreme Court) were found guilty, and most were sentenced to expulsion. On review only 10 expulsions were upheld.

This post is, of course, merely an excuse to give a recipe for eggnog. Most people in the U.S. settle for cartons of commercially made eggnog (spiked with rum). Not me. My wife had an old family recipe which we made every Christmas Eve. If you try it you will never have commercial eggnog again. Warning !!! This recipe is made from raw eggs, so you must be careful about people with allergies, and must be absolutely sure that your eggs are bacteria free. My wife made it so strong it would fell a horse. It’s perfectly delectable, but not the same, without the bourbon. We always used Maker’s Mark, and you should use the best bourbon you can find. A full batch uses one dozen eggs, but we always made it with half a dozen, because a full batch would have killed us. I don’t believe you can go wrong with this recipe because it’s just eggs, cream, and sugar. You can vary the quantity of sugar to suit your tastes.  We always used a 1950s hand-held electric beater owned by my wife’s grandmother. Hand held is more convenient than a stand mixer. That way you can beat the yolks and cream directly in the punch bowl.

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©Blincoe Family Kentucky Eggnog

Ingredients

6 eggs, separated
1 pint heavy cream
½ cup caster sugar
½ bottle bourbon
nutmeg

Instructions

Beat the egg yolks to a creamy yellow. Add the cream and sugar and beat until frothy. Pour this mix into a punch bowl.

Beat the egg whites until firm but not stiff. Spoon on top of the mix in the bowl.

Gently pour the bourbon into the eggnog down the side of the bowl, and give the whole mix a gentle stir with a ladle.

Ladle into punch glasses and top with freshly grated nutmeg.