Dec 182019
 

Today features the second O Antiphon,  O Adonai (O Lord) 

O Adonai, et Dux domus Israel, qui Moysi in igne flammae rubi apparuisti, et ei in Sina legem dedisti: veni ad redimendum nos in brachio extento.

O Adonai, and Leader of the house of Israel, Who didst appear to Moses in the flame of the burning bush, and didst give unto him the Law on Sinai: come and with an outstretched arm redeem us.

The name of God most often used in the Hebrew Bible is the Tetragrammaton יהוה (YHWH). Owing to the Jewish tradition viewing the divine name as too sacred to be uttered it was replaced vocally in the synagogue ritual by the Hebrew word Adonai (“My Lord”), which was translated as Kyrios (“Lord”) in the Septuagint, the Greek version of the Hebrew scriptures. It is frequently anglicized as Yahweh or Jehovah. Ancient readers of the Hebrew Bible were signaled not to read YHWH aloud in the Masoretic text, by placing the vowels for Adonai (A O AI) under YHWH – making an impossible word YAHOWAIH. All readers understood that YHWH could not be spoken, but Adonai was acceptable. They did not write the word Adonai in the text itself because the text was sacred and unalterable.  Everyone understood.  Centuries later, non-Jews, who did not know the convention thought that YAHOWAIH was correct, and pronounced it Jehovah.  Jehovah has never been correct. In most English editions of the Bible YHWH is translated as “the LORD” (in caps).

Adonai (אֲדֹנָי, lit. “My Lords”) is actually the plural form of adon (“Lord”) along with the first-person singular pronoun enclitic (“my”). As with Elohim [lit. “Gods” but referring to ONE God], Adonai’s grammatical form is usually explained as a plural of majesty (same as, “we are not amused”). In the Hebrew Bible, it is nearly always used to refer to God (approximately 450 occurrences). Owing to the expansion of chumra (the idea of “building a fence around the Torah”), Adonai itself has come to be too holy to say for Orthodox Jews, leading to its replacement by HaShem (“The Name”). The singular forms adon and adoni (“my lord”) are used in the Hebrew Bible as royal titles, and for distinguished persons. Using Adonai as a name for Jesus signals that he is also God.

I am not sure why, but in the US the use of Adonai in a business’s same usually signals that it is owned by an evangelical Christian.  I think this is an example:

Here is a recipe from a website called Adonai Natural Health (edited). http://adonaihealth.com.au/category/adonai/recipes/  It’s for a quick version of “baked” beans.  It’s not too bad.  I prefer slow-baked beans, but this can work. Anything homecooked is better than canned. By that token, the recipe calls for canned beans, but cooking dried beans yourself is better.

Ingredients

1 onion, peeled and finely diced
3 slices lean bacon, finely diced
½ red bell pepper, finely diced
1 tomato, finely diced
1 tsp yellow mustard powder
3 tbsp tomato paste
2 cups cooked canellini or butter beans
2 cups cooked red kidney beans
¼ cup fresh chopped parsley

olive oil

Instructions

In a saucepan heat a small amount of olive oil. Cook the onion until it softens then add the bacon and stir for 1 minute. Add the bell pepper and tomato and cook for 2 minutes or until just soft Add the mustard and tomato paste and allow the mixture to simmer for another 2 minutes. Add the beans and parsley to the pot and stir until combined and heated through.

To Serve: Top with sliced avocado or a poached egg.

 

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